DSE 5.0 Multi-Instance Demo – Build and Configure

DSE 5.0 Multi-Instance Demo

The new Multi-Instance feature released with DSE 5.0 allows for the simple deployment of multiple DSE instances on a single machine.

This helps customer ensure that large hardware resources are effectively utilized for database applications, and making more efficient use of hardware can help reduce overall project costs.

DataStax Multi-Instance documentation can be found here: https://docs.datastax.com/en/latest-dse/datastax_enterprise/multiInstance/configMultiInstance.html

Build a DSE Node

You can use a bare machine, an empty VM, a docker image, whatever. I recommend at least a couple of CPU’s and 6GB+ prefereably 8GB.

Most leading flavours of Linux supported. Here I’m using Ubuntu Precise64 that comes with the build I’m using.

I’m using a Virtualbox VM created using Vagrant that provisions a single large node designed to support multiple instances of DataStax Enterprise. The repo for that can be found here: https://github.com/simonambridge/vagrant-DSE-multi-instance

>This Vagrant build is based on Joel Jacobson’s great multi-node vagrant build that cerates a three node cluster with an opscentre VM. You’ll find it described here: https://github.com/joeljacobson/vagrant-ansible-cassandra

Whatever you’re using, start your VM or environment and move on to the next section for configuration details.

If you’re using vagrant, after you’ve built the machine or vagrant virtual box, if it isn’t running, start it with:

vagrant up dse-node

You can check what VM’s are available to vagrant:

vagrant global-status

Configure The VM for DSE

Now log into the DSE node. For the vagrant build use:

vagrant ssh dse-node

Update ulimit

You first need to update the ulimits so that your vargrant user (or whatever OS cassandra username you’ll use) can start DSE.
There is a separate conf file to set ulimits for the cassandra user

sudo vi /etc/security/limits.d/cassandra.conf

Add or update the entries in there to look like this:

vagrant - memlock unlimited
vagrant - nofile 100000
vagrant - nproc 32768
vagrant - as unlimited

Now log out and ssh back into the box as the vagrant user in order to pick up the new ulimits.

Create Virtual IP Addresses For The Instances

Back in the vagrant VM, we need to create some IP aliases for our new instances – use the

ifconfig

command:

ifconfig lo:0 127.0.0.2 netmask 255.0.0.0 up
ifconfig lo:1 127.0.0.3 netmask 255.0.0.0 up
ifconfig lo:2 127.0.0.4 netmask 255.0.0.0 up

Create Aliases for the Virtual IPs

Update

/etc/hosts

to make it easier with aliases:

127.0.0.2 node1 dse-node1
127.0.0.3 node2 dse-node2
127.0.0.4 node3 dse-node3

Now you can use e.g.

cqlsh node3

Add Node 1

Use the

`add-node

utility to add a multi-instance node

You can call your node what you like but it will be prefixed automatically with

dse-

So

node1

will be

dse-node1

etc.

We don’t have a valid seed address here as we’re creating the first node.

> NB Do not attempt to add a node to the default dse node service that gets created when you install DSE. DSE Multi-Instance maintains a naming nomenclature for the nodes it creates and manages, and the dse service doesn’t fit in. Keeping it running will just confuse things when you have nodes managed by multi-instance. Shut it down and keep it to play with when you’re not playing with multi-instance. YMMV

So, now we know that we only need the installation of DSE to give us the binaries, config templates and filesystem layout. We don’t need the service that is pre-configured for a stand-alone instance.

Lets add the first node. We’ll call it node1 (so it will be called dse-node1), create a cluster called Cassandra, using the first of the IP aliases that we created. We don’t have a seed to talk to so we use ourself as a seed:

sudo dse add-node --node-id node1 --cluster Cassandra --listen-address 127.0.0.2 --rpc-address 127.0.0.2 --seeds 127.0.0.2
Installing and configuring from /usr/share/dse/templates/

+ Setting up node dse-node1...
  - Copying configs
      - Setting the cluster name.
      - Setting up JMX port
      - Setting up directories
Warning: Spark shuffle service port not set. Spark nodes will use the default binding options.
Done.

You can specify the rack ID e.g. if you are setting up nodes on a different machine (default is rack 1):

--rack=rack_name

The template filesystem structure for this new node will now have been created. You’ll find configuration files in:

sudo ls /etc/dse-node1
byoh	     cassandra	 dse-node1.init  dse.yaml  hadoop	   hive    pig	 spark	tomcat
byoh-env.sh  dse-env.sh  dserc-env.sh	 graph	   hadoop2-client  mahout  solr  sqoop

Here you set whether you want it to be a Cassandra, Spark, Solr node etc:

> ignore this if you just want Cassandra

sudo vi /etc/default/dse-node1

Data lives here:

sudo ls /var/lib/dse-node1
commitlog  data  hints	saved_caches  spark

Logs live here:

sudo ls /var/log/dse-node1
audit  debug.log  gremlin.log  output.log  spark  system.log

Although

add-node

told you that it was setting up the JMX port, I found that it uses 7199 each time it runs (e.g. it doesn’t appear to check if the port is in use) so you need to set the port yourself.

I set the port on the first node just so that it doesnt conflict with the port used by the default dse service that I might want to start one day.

Set the Node 1 JMX port

JMX_PORT="7299"

The nodetool utility communicates through JMX on port 7199. We need to change it for our instance.

>As its running on a different host IP, you should theoretically be able to use 7199, but I found that nodetool didn’t recognise the aliases but would bind with just the JMX address e.g.

nodetool -p 7299

Edit the cassandra-env.sh file for this node.

Search for 7199 and change it to 7299

sudo vi /etc/dse-node1/cassandra/cassandra-env.sh

JMX_PORT="7299"
JVM_OPTS="$JVM_OPTS -Djava.rmi.server.hostname=127.0.0.2"

Start The Node 1 Service

sudo service dse-node1 start
 * Starting DSE daemons (dse-node1) dse-node1
DSE daemons (dse-node1) starting with only Cassandra enabled (edit /etc/default/dse-node1 to enable other features)

Check the log file to make sure everything’s rosy:

sudo tail -100 /var/log/dse-node1/system.log

If all goes to plan you should see:

INFO  [main] 2016-07-13 05:46:18,137  ThriftServer.java:119 - Binding thrift service to /127.0.0.2:9160
INFO  [Thread-3] 2016-07-13 05:46:18,145  ThriftServer.java:136 - Listening for thrift clients...
INFO  [main] 2016-07-13 05:46:18,145  DseDaemon.java:827 - DSE startup complete.

We can check the cluster with the new multi-instance support – use the node name:

sudo dse dse-node1 dsetool ring
Address          DC                   Rack         Workload             Graph  Status  State    Load             Owns                 Token                                        Health [0,1]
127.0.0.2        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   133.53 KB        ?                    -9098225573757054999                         0.00

We can access via cqlsh:

$ cqlsh 127.0.0.2
Connected to Cassandra at 127.0.0.2:9042.
[cqlsh 5.0.1 | Cassandra 3.0.7.1159 | DSE 5.0.1 | CQL spec 3.4.0 | Native protocol v4]
Use HELP for help.
cqlsh> exit

Add Node 2

Same command as before, same cluster name, this time with the next available virtual IP address.
This time we point to the first node that we created to use it as a seed node

sudo dse add-node --node-id node2 --cluster Cassandra --listen-address 127.0.0.3 --rpc-address 127.0.0.3 --seeds 127.0.0.2
Installing and configuring from /usr/share/dse/templates/

+ Setting up node dse-node2...
  - Copying configs
      - Setting the cluster name.
      - Setting up JMX port
      - Setting up directories
Warning: Spark shuffle service port not set. Spark nodes will use the default binding options.
Done.

Set the Node 2 JMX port

JMX_PORT="7399"

Search for 7199 and change it to 7399, and set the JMX hostname to the IP alias for this instance:

sudo vi /etc/dse-node2/cassandra/cassandra-env.sh
JMX_PORT="7399"
JVM_OPTS="$JVM_OPTS -Djava.rmi.server.hostname=127.0.0.3"

Start The Node 2 Service

sudo service dse-node2 start
 * Starting DSE daemons (dse-node2) dse-node2
DSE daemons (dse-node2) starting with only Cassandra enabled (edit /etc/default/dse-node2 to enable other features)

Check it:

sudo tail -100 /var/log/dse-node2/system.log

How does my cluster look? Notice how the machine ID is displayed when you have more than one node in a cluster – so you know where your nodes are running:

sudo dse dse-node1 dsetool ring
Server ID          Address          DC                   Rack         Workload             Graph  Status  State    Load             Owns                 Token                                        Health [0,1]
                                                                                                                                                         -9024954150119957189
08-00-27-88-0C-A6  127.0.0.2        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   133.53 KB        ?                    -9098225573757054999                         0.10
08-00-27-88-0C-A6  127.0.0.3        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   116.85 KB        ?                    -9024954150119957189                         0.10

Access from cqlsh:

cqlsh 127.0.0.3
Connected to Cassandra at 127.0.0.3:9042.
[cqlsh 5.0.1 | Cassandra 3.0.7.1159 | DSE 5.0.1 | CQL spec 3.4.0 | Native protocol v4]
Use HELP for help.
cqlsh> exit

We can have a peek and see the cluster name we specified – the data centre is also called Cassandra:

cqlsh> select cluster_name from system.local;

 cluster_name
--------------
   Cassandra
(1 rows)

cqlsh> select data_center from system.local;

 data_center
-------------
   Cassandra
(1 rows)

The gossip info shows we are up on our IP aliases:

sudo nodetool -p 7299 gossipinfo
/127.0.0.2
  generation:1469729834
  heartbeat:312526
  STATUS:18:NORMAL,-9098225573757054999
  LOAD:312403:2.6772283E7
  SCHEMA:35:335c1225-bfd5-3a7a-83d4-8cafde713850
  DC:54:Cassandra
  RACK:12:rack1
  RELEASE_VERSION:4:3.0.7.1159
  RPC_ADDRESS:3:127.0.0.2
  X_11_PADDING:264567:{"dse_version":"5.0.1","workload":"Cassandra","server_id":"08-00-27-88-0C-A6","graph":false,"active":"true","health":0.9}
  SEVERITY:312528:0.0
  NET_VERSION:1:10
  HOST_ID:2:52840937-5fe7-4586-85c3-51077a4dfc35
  RPC_READY:59:true
  TOKENS:17:
/127.0.0.3
  generation:1469729819
  heartbeat:312568
  STATUS:20:NORMAL,-9024954150119957189
  LOAD:312399:2.423628E7
  SCHEMA:79:335c1225-bfd5-3a7a-83d4-8cafde713850
  DC:67:Cassandra
  RACK:12:rack1
  RELEASE_VERSION:4:3.0.7.1159
  RPC_ADDRESS:3:127.0.0.3
  X_11_PADDING:264770:{"dse_version":"5.0.1","workload":"Cassandra","server_id":"08-00-27-88-0C-A6","graph":false,"active":"true","health":0.9}
  SEVERITY:312567:0.0
  NET_VERSION:1:10
  HOST_ID:2:4a1985eb-075e-43da-8a9f-d13717d371ff
  RPC_READY:81:true
  TOKENS:19:

Add Node 3 – Standalone

Now we’re going to create a new multi-instance managed node, but this time in a different cluster.

Same command as before, different cluster name, different virtual IP address, and we don’t have a seed address.

sudo dse add-node --node-id node3 --cluster NewCluster --listen-address 127.0.0.4 --rpc-address 127.0.0.4 --seeds 127.0.0.4
Installing and configuring from /usr/share/dse/templates/

+ Setting up node dse-node3...
  - Copying configs
      - Setting the cluster name.
      - Setting up JMX port
      - Setting up directories
Warning: Spark shuffle service port not set. Spark nodes will use the default binding options.
Done.

Set the jmx port JMX_PORT=”7499″

Search for 7199 and change it to 7499, and set the JMX hostname to the IP alias for this instance:

sudo vi /etc/dse-node3/cassandra/cassandra-env.sh
JMX_PORT="7499"
JVM_OPTS="$JVM_OPTS -Djava.rmi.server.hostname=127.0.0.4"

Check your different cluster name

cluster_name: NewCluster
sudo vi /etc/dse-node3/cassandra/cassandra.yaml

Start The Node 3 Service

sudo service dse-node3 start
 * Starting DSE daemons (dse-node3) dse-node3
DSE daemons (dse-node3) starting with only Cassandra enabled (edit /etc/default/dse-node3 to enable other features)

And again:

sudo tail -100 /var/log/dse-node3/system.log

We want to see:

INFO  [main] 2016-07-13 13:07:29,996  ThriftServer.java:119 - Binding thrift service to /127.0.0.4:9160
INFO  [Thread-3] 2016-07-13 13:07:30,005  ThriftServer.java:136 - Listening for thrift clients...
INFO  [main] 2016-07-13 13:07:30,005  DseDaemon.java:827 - DSE startup complete.

We can access with cqlsh:

cqlsh 127.0.0.4
Connected to NewCluster at 127.0.0.4:9042.
[cqlsh 5.0.1 | Cassandra 3.0.7.1159 | DSE 5.0.1 | CQL spec 3.4.0 | Native protocol v4]
Use HELP for help.
cqlsh> exit

We can look at the first cluster we created:

sudo dse dse-node2 dsetool ring
Server ID          Address          DC                   Rack         Workload             Graph  Status  State    Load             Owns                 Token                                        Health [0,1]
                                                                                                                                                         -9024954150119957189
08-00-27-88-0C-A6  127.0.0.2        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   133.53 KB        ?                    -9098225573757054999                         0.20
08-00-27-88-0C-A6  127.0.0.3        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   116.99 KB        ?                    -9024954150119957189                         0.20
Note: you must specify a keyspace to get ownership information.

We can look at the second cluster:

sudo dse dse-node3 dsetool ring
Address          DC                   Rack         Workload             Graph  Status  State    Load             Owns                 Token                                        Health [0,1]
127.0.0.4        Cassandra            rack1        Cassandra            no     Up      Normal   88.15 KB         ?                    -2000014393878253047                         0.00
Note: you must specify a keyspace to get ownership information.

We can poke around a bit in the second cluster and see that it has a different cluster name:

cqlsh> select cluster_name from system.local;

 cluster_name
--------------
   NewCluster
(1 rows)

cqlsh> select data_center from system.local;

 data_center
-------------
   Cassandra
(1 rows)

Connect with JMX

We can check the JMX parameters in use in the process JVM Arguments:

"-Djava.rmi.server.hostname=127.0.0.2, -Dcassandra.jmx.local.port=7299,"

Use the JMX port with nodetool to connect:

nodetool -p 7299 status
Datacenter: Cassandra
=====================
Status=Up/Down
|/ State=Normal/Leaving/Joining/Moving
--  Address    Load       Tokens       Owns    Host ID                               Rack
UN  127.0.0.2  18.29 MB   1            ?       52840937-5fe7-4586-85c3-51077a4dfc35  rack1
UN  127.0.0.3  15.38 MB   1            ?       4a1985eb-075e-43da-8a9f-d13717d371ff  rack1

Note: Non-system keyspaces don't have the same replication settings, effective ownership information is meaningless

Check that JMX is up for node1:

netstat -tulpn | grep 7299
(No info could be read for "-p": geteuid()=1000 but you should be root.)
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7299          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      -

And for node2:

netstat -tulpn | grep 7399
(No info could be read for "-p": geteuid()=1000 but you should be root.)
tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7399          0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN

*See my other repo for details on installing and configuring opscenter and datastax-agent for multi-instance*

Things go wrong sometimes – if you need to remove a node….

Use the

remove-node

tool:

$ sudo dse remove-node node1 --purge
##############################
#
# WARNING
# You're trying to remove node dse-node1
# This means that all configuration files for dse-node1 will be deleted
#
##############################

Do you wish to continue?
1) Yes
2) No
#? Yes
#? 1
 * Stopping DSE daemons (dse-node1) dse-node1                                                                                                                                               [ OK ]
Deleting /etc/dse/serverconfig/dse-node1
Deleting /etc/dse-node1
Deleting /etc/init.d/dse-node1
Deleting /etc/default/dse-node1
Deleting /var/run/dse-node1

Use the purge option to clean up data and logs or do it manually:

sudo rm -rf /var/lib/dse-node3
sudo rm -rf /var/log/dse-node3

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